Don Hladiuk imaged the Sun as it set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. | SkyNews
Don Hladiuk captured an annular eclipse from a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012.

How to photograph a solar eclipse

Here are a few simple photography tips from eclipse chaser Don Hladiuk on keeping your eyes safe and capturing a great digital memory.

There will be an amazing show for early risers across Canada lucky enough to have clear skies on June 10, 2021. An annular eclipse will pass over northern Ontario, Quebec and Nunavut, while many other regions will see a partial solar eclipse.

Want to capture the experience? Here are a few simple tips from eclipse chaser Don Hladiuk on keeping your eyes safe and shooting a great digital memory.

Safety

One must always use a certified solar filter to view all phases of any annular eclipse, even during annularity. Protect your camera sensor, too, by never pointing it in the direction of the Sun without first placing a solar filter over the front of the lens. I REALLY WANT TO EMPHASIZE SAFETY. IT IS PARAMOUNT. EYES ARE SO IMPORTANT.

Don Hladiuk imaged the Sun as it set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. | SkyNews
Don Hladiuk captured an annular eclipse from a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012.

Focus

One of the most difficult aspects to eclipse photography is achieving a sharp focus. Aim your telescope (with the solar filter on) at the Sun’s limb or on any sunspots. Use the camera’s live view to magnify the image and bring the camera to the sharpest focus possible. 

Quantity

Shoot several images using various shutter speeds. The perfect exposure will show some limb darkening.

Reduce camera vibration

Another tip to producing a sharp image is reducing camera vibration. Just the process of pressing the camera shutter button down will cause camera vibration. Use a remote shutter trigger or the camera’s self-timer to reduce camera vibration when taking an image. A sturdy mount/tripod is also key to reducing vibrations that could be caused by wind and blur your image.

Practice

Practice is the key to capturing a good solar eclipse photo. It is important to take practice photos of the Sun using your solar filter and telescope setup. 

Safety — again

If you are unsure, please ask someone with solar viewing experience or watch the event online.

Or project the Sun instead. This is one of the safest ways to observe the sun as you are only looking at a projection. This is perfect for viewing the partial phases or even an annular eclipse.

Read more about the June 10, 2021 annular solar eclipse here.

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