The Sun experienced an annular eclipse as it set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. This image is of its partial phase.| SkyNews
The Sun setting during the partial phase of an annular eclipse. (Don Hladiuk)

Annular eclipse: June 10, 2021

How can you see this summer’s solar eclipse in Canada? What is an annular eclipse, anyway? SkyNews has the details here.

What is a solar eclipse?

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon crosses between the Sun and the Earth. It blocks the Sun’s light briefly, casting a shadow on the Earth.

A graphic of a solar eclipse, where the Moon crosses the path between the Sun and the Earth, casting a shadow. | SkyNews
(Graphic by Isabelle Santiago)

What is an annular eclipse?

When the Moon is smaller in our sky than the Sun, it creates an annular or “ring of fire” eclipse, meaning a thin ring of sunlight occurs around the shadow of the Moon. For more on why this happens, check out Page 30 in the May/June 2021 edition of SkyNews.

On the morning of the eclipse, if you’re in the path of annularity in Canada, you’ll see the Sun as a ring.

If you’re in the path of the partial eclipse, you’ll see the Moon blocking part of the Sun, perhaps like someone took a bite out of the Sun. The partial eclipse will last for about an hour after sunrise.

The Sun experienced an annular eclipse as it set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. | SkyNews
An annular, or “ring of fire” eclipse. (Don Hladiuk)
The Sun experienced an annular eclipse as it set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. This image is of its partial phase.| SkyNews
The Sun setting during the partial phase of an annular eclipse. (Don Hladiuk)

NEVER LOOK AT AN ECLIPSE DIRECTLY

You could really hurt your eyes. ALWAYS use ISO-approved solar viewers.

Not sure you’re using them correctly? Check out this video of Dr. Ralph Chou, an eclipse chaser who has seen around 25 solar eclipses.

Who will see the eclipse?

Across Canada, the partial phase of the June 10, 2021 eclipse will be visible from many regions, while annularity will be visible from parts of northern Ontario, Quebec and Nunavut.

The map of where the full and partial annular eclipse June 10, 2021, will land. | SkyNews
The map of where the full and partial annular eclipse June 10, 2021, will land. (Data by Fred Espenak, NASA/GSFC emeritus. Design by Rosie Sobczuk.)

As the Sun rises June 10, the Moon’s shadow will race up Canada, through Nunavut and over the North Pole.

Draw a line down North America, from the Yukon to Georgia. People east of that line will get a view of the partial eclipse. A strip around the globe, from Lake Superior to Russia, will see the annular eclipse.

The map here shows where the partial eclipse will be visible in white. The orange block shows where the annular eclipse will be visible.

For more details about this annular eclipse as well as locations and times, check out The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada’s 2021 Observer’s Handbook.

For eclipse times and more: EclipseWise.com

RESPECT COVID-19 RESTRICTIONS

Slow the spread of COVID-19. Respect the guidelines in place around Canada limiting travel, and do not visit a region in the eclipse path if it is against local rules and restrictions.

Expert advice

“As the beginning of the annular solar eclipse this June starts at sunrise in northern Ontario, those fortunate to be in this part of the path of annularity will be challenged in having a clear horizon at sunrise due to the topography of the land and the forest cover. Furthermore, the weather prospects are not very promising. But if chance favours you, a beautiful sunrise with about 88 per cent of the Sun obscured awaits you.”

Stephen Bedingfield, eclipse chaser

Jeff Swick caught this picture of his granddaughter, Lexy McLeod, viewing the eclipse May 20, 2012, from Paddockwood, Saskatchewan. | SkyNews
Lexy McLeod viewing the eclipse May 20, 2012. (Jeff Swick)

On May 20, 2012, in Paddockwood, Saskatchewan, Lexy McLeod got a view of an eclipse. Her grandfather, Jeff Swick, caught the moment on camera.

“Make it fun for the kids and let them know what they should expect. If it’s fun for them, it will be fun for you. Don’t set up for the first time in front of friends and family, because the pressure will be on and you may forget things or not think clearly. Most of all, have fun and enjoy this truly wonderful spectacle.”

“Remember to cover your finder scope. Never EVER rely on eyepiece filters that come with department store telescopes. I can’t say that enough. Irreversible eye damage can happen in less than a second. Reach out to your local RASC Centre or the national office for more information.”

Jeff Swick

Don Hladiuk imaged the Sun as it set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. | SkyNews
Don Hladiuk captured an annular eclipse from a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012.

Don Hladiuk took this image as the Sun set a little west of Cedar City, Utah, on May 20, 2012. He took a normal sunset image with the same lens configuration (and without solar filter) as his background image, and then added the filtered eclipse photos using Photoshop. The interval between the eclipse images is 10 minutes.

More eclipse resources

For weather predictions: Eclipsophile.com
For teachers: Discover the Universe
For free eclipse viewers: The Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (order before May 10, 2021)

To purchase an eclipse viewer from SkyNews, click here.

RASC INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY: Safely Viewing the Sun
Tuesday, May 25, 2021 •  3:30 to 5 p.m EDT

Have you ever seen the Sun? Of course you have. But have you ever been able to safely look directly at the Sun? The Sun has begun to acquire spots now that it has passed through solar minimum. We’ll go over how to get into safe solar viewing, including how to use filters to safely see it with a telescope or binoculars, how to make a pinhole projector, and what features to look for. Then you’ll be ready to view the partial solar eclipse that will be visible in much of Canada on June 10!

Register here! Videos will also be livestreamed to The RASC YouTube Channel.

Read more about eclipses

This spring, learn about Canada’s two eclipses, Juno’s exciting future around Jupiter and Canadians helping others with astronomical tasks. All in this SkyNews!

The May/June 2021 cover of SkyNews Magazine.
(Cover image © Seán Doran/with Gerald Eichstadt & NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

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